How a personal loan can help you secure your future?

A steady and secured future is what every one of us dreams of. But the rising cost of our lifestyle is making it hard for us to secure our future financially. The cost of our lifestyle can be defined as the daily amount that we are spending behind our necessities and luxuries. Even if you cut off the luxury amount, you will find that the amount that we need to survive is quite high. Even though the money spent behind our lifestyle will vary from one person to another, as well as from one family to another, but it is entirely true that every person or family runs needs financial support at some point in their life. And in today’s world, there are enough financial support options available in the market that one could opt for.

The demand for a credit card is rising with every passing day. Most of the retailers and stores that you will come across are ready to accept credit card as a method of payment. But, the major drawback behind credit card loan is their interest rate which is sky high. Most of the people who use a credit card to make multiple purchases fall in the trap of debt after a few months. As the interest rates are so high, people are unable to pay off the original loaned amount. So, when it comes to an affordable loan solution, private loans are one of the best choices. It is a flexible money lending solution which can be used for the various purpose and can also be paid back easily as the interest is much lower being compared to the other types of loan. When it comes to a private loan, there are multiple benefits associated with it. So, let us have a look at some of the top benefits that one could avail if they opt for a private loan.

Why go for personal loans?

Personal loans are one of the quickest solutions that provide easy access to quick cash. A private loan can be availed by any person who is looking forward to an affordable loaning solution for any emergency or other personal requirements. A personal loan can be availed to pay off the school expenses, paying off the wedding bills, for buying any costly item, etc. With the multiple benefits provided, the demand for a private loan is one the rise.

A private loan can also be defined as a form of unsecured loan where you don’t need to give anything for security or collateral damage. This is the main reason why any person can opt for a private loan. There are now plenty of lenders available both online and offline who are ready to provide private loan for an affordable sum of interest. In today’s busy and quick moving world, a quick solution for everything is what everyone dreams off. And any person can avail a private loan by just filling up an application. You can fill up the loan form …


5 Major Applications of Fastener

We may not be aware, but fasteners are used everywhere, ranging from household appliances to cars, high tech gadgets, industrial machines, defence equipment and more. The global market for industrial fastener suppliers reached $80 billion in 2016 and is predicted to reach $95 billion by 2019.

Fasteners are universal apparatus used to create non-permanent joints which can be dismantled without damage to each of the components. Versatile and highly functional, fasteners such as bolts, nuts, washers, screws and nails reduce the need for larger parts or complex designs. In addition, fasteners are manufactured in a manner that each product can be traced back to the original manufacturer in case of any fault or error.

Overall, the Asia Pacific region is expected to remain the fasted growing market for fastener demand, followed by North America with countries of China, India, South Korea, Thailand, Brazil and Saudi Arabia leading the demand in coming years.

Here’s a look at 5 major applications of Fasteners:

  • Automotives

There is significant use of fasteners in the manufacturing of all types of vehicles and cars, ranging from stainless steel fasteners used for corrosion resistant properties to iron for its high strength traits. By using fasteners, other components of the vehicles can be mass produced easily and strength and integrity can also be maintained. Components can also be transported in an easier manner, allowing production in one location and assembly in another. Demand for automotive fasteners is higher in developing nations.

  • Electrical and Electronics

A variety of specialized fasteners are used in electrical and electronic items, serving multiple purposes. Fasteners again allow speedy mass production of the different component parts, and unique fasteners make the electronic items tamper-proof. Ranging from the installation of circuit boards to assembly of laptops, mobile phones and refrigerators, all use fasteners.

  • Aerospace

Considering the giant sizes of aerospace equipment, including airplanes and rockets, it is more practical and secure to construct individual components of the planes and then join them together using fasteners instead of larger designs.

The demand for aerospace fasteners is expected to be higher in North America and in the European Union.

  • Construction

Fasteners are used in each and every step of construction, whether it is building the floors, walls, roofs, stairs or insulation. Different types of fasteners are used based on the materials being joined, the tensile requirement and the aesthetic needs.

Commercial and industrial construction demands are recovering across regions in North America, Western Europe and the Asia Pacific region, and are growing rapidly in developing countries.

  • Medical Equipment

For any piece of medical equipment, it is essential that it be balanced, hygienic and accurate, which is adhered to by using specialised fasteners resistant to corrosion. Large devices such as MRI and CT machines as well as smaller equipment such as blood and fluid analyzers, forceps and retractors use fasteners.

In addition, transport of medical equipment is made easier by the use of fasteners as the components of medical devices can be assembled upon delivery.

Due to the


The Top 4 Benefits Working as a Digital Marketing Professional

The digital dispensation has seen more and more brands jump aboard the digital marketing bandwagon as the focus is more towards digital advertising and marketing strategies. As such, marketers have to continually improve their skills and knowledge because they are professionals who are in serious demand. For them, the digital marketing landscape is one of promise with the potential of getting higher pay, better budgets, and more career choices among other benefits.

If you are lost on which career path to take or what to study, then below are the major benefits of working in the field of digital marketing that may convince that this is the career direction to take.

1. Be an In-Demand Professional

It is projected that there will be around 150,000 digital job opportunities open by the year 2020. However, there currently is a limited number of professionals to fill up those slots. So, those studying digital marketing will have a competitive advantage since they are setting themselves up for a line of work whose demand exceeds supply. It is estimated that the demand for digital marketing professionals will spike upwards by more than 35% and will keep rising in the coming years. Given such the status of such as promising career, it is high time you took advantage.

Hot Tip: Do some research to know which are the most sought-after skills in digital marketing before you embark on studying for the career.

2. Enjoy More Career Choice

Many of the leading giants and authorities in the digital sphere, such as Google, Twitter and the like, have set up shop in Dublin, with many have their headquarters there. As such, the city is an ideal place for digital professionals who are seeking job opportunities. Different local brands and multinationals including SMEs located in Dublin will never go more than a week without announcing open digital job opportunities. But the same is also being seen in other countries and big cities around the world.

Take Ryanair for instance; it created 200 jobs with a majority of them being positions for digital marketing professionals. Enda Kenny announced, at the Web Summit, 400 new job positions for a range of digital marketing opportunities that include areas such as social media. Microsoft is planning to increase its staff by hiring 1000 more digital marketing graduates while LinkedIn is also set to make a similar move by doubling its workforce to the tune of 1200 employees working in digital marketing.

Given the projected number of new job opportunities (see Stopgap.co.uk), digital marketers can afford to be a bit picky about the kind of company to join and brand to be associated with.

3. Get Paid More Than Your Peers

When demand is higher than supply, prices skyrocket. The same principle applies when it comes to a situation where there are more job opportunities than the works that will fill up those slots. As such, you have the upper hand when working in a fruitful industry that has a significant workforce …


How to Find A Job in 2018 : The Ultimate Guide

You are looking for a job then, starting with a job portal like Good Job Creations, is an excellent way to acquaint yourself with latest job openings. Of course, there are several avenues to look for a reasonable job in Singapore but, finding a job through a reliable job portal saves you from the hassle of going from website to website to look for a job opening. You can visit goodjobcreations.com.sg to learn more about the job portal. The following ultimate guide covers the essentials that one needs to know for finding a job in 2018:

  1. Experiment with several options

While searching for a job via a job portal saves you from the hassle of looking for a job online, you should definitely turn to different methods for looking a job. You should look for a job in newspaper advertisements, career placement offices, career websites, and what not. Since the job marketplace in Singapore is expansive and gigantic, you should not rely on one method to find a job of your dreams.

      2. Build a network

Finding a job may sound like a piece of cake but, it is definitely a lengthy and elaborate process, and you should indulge in various methods to find a job that suits your aspirations and skills set. You should start with building a network with the professionals in your desirable job field. You can also consider maintaining a connection with them on LinkedIn. It would allow you to explore your options better, and it would definitely score you a better job in the long run.

      3. Visit a company’s website

If you are dreaming to work with a company of your preference then, you should visit their website continuously to learn about any job openings relevant to your skills set and qualifications. If there is no job opening featured on the platform then, you should consider asking them about their upcoming job openings in the future.

      4. Dress professionally

If you are shortlisted and called in for an interview then, you should focus on dressing professionally. It would set the tone that you are actually looking for a job and you are ready to commit your time and skills set to it. Also, if you do not dress professionally to a job interview, it could risk your chances of getting a job.

      5. Attend job fairs

If you are looking for a job in Singapore then, you should consider attending job fairs in your spare time. It would instantly connect you to a pool of professionals, and it would escalate your chances of scoring a well-paying job in your desirable area or industry.

You should appear professional and confident at job fairs and you should pay attention to a representative of a company when they introduce their company and recent job openings to you.


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Canva Uncovered: How A Young Australian Kitesurfer Built A $3.2 Billion (Profitable!) Startup Phenom

On a steamy May morning in 2013, Canva CEO Melanie Perkins found herself adrift on a kiteboard in the channel between billionaire Richard Branson’s private Necker and Moskito islands. Her 30-foot sail floating deflated and useless beside her in the strong eastern Caribbean current, the 26-year-old entrepreneur waited for hours to be rescued. As she treaded water, her left leg scarred by a past collision with a coral reef, she reminded herself that her dangerous new hobby was worth it. After all, it was key to the fundraising strategy for the design-software startup she’d cofounded with her boyfriend six years before. Canva was based in Australia, thousands of miles from tech’s Silicon Valley power corridor. Getting a meeting—much less funding—was proving tough. Perkins heard “no” from more than 100 investors. So when she met the organizer of a group of kitesurfing venture capitalists at a pitch competition in her native Perth, Perkins got to training. The next time the group met to hear startup pitches and potentially write crucial early-stage funding checks, she’d have a seat at the table—even if it meant having to brave treacherous waters. “It was like, risk: serious damage; reward: start company,” Perkins says. “If you get your foot in the door just a tiny bit, you have to kind of wedge it all the way in.” Such perseverance has long been a necessity at Canva, which began as a modest yearbook-design business in the state capital of Perth on Australia’s west coast. From those remote origins, Canva has grown into a global juggernaut. Twenty-million-plus users from 190 countries use the company’s “freemium” Web-based app to design everything from splashy Pinterest graphics to elegant restaurant menus. Besides an impossible-to-beat price (millions of users pay nothing at all), Canva’s key advantage over rival products from tech giants like Adobe has been its ease of use. Before Canva, amateurs had to stitch together designs in Microsoft Word or pay through the nose for confusing professional tools. Today, anyone, anywhere, can download Canva and be creating within ten minutes. The company’s revenue comes from upselling to a $10-a-month premium version with snazzier features or, more recently, from sales of a streamlined corporate account option. High-quality stock photos—of which Canva has millions—cost another $1. It adds up. This year the company expects to more than double its revenue to $200 million; its most recent $85 million funding round valued it at $3.2 billion. Perkins, now 32 and an alum of the 2016 Forbes 30 Under 30 Asia list, has an estimated 15% stake, valued at $430 million. Throw in her 34-year-old cofounder—and now fiancé—Cliff Obrecht’s similar stake, and the Aussie power couple are likely worth more than $800 million. In an era of billion-dollar checks from SoftBank and high-profile profligacy at WeWork, Perkins and Obrecht do things differently. They are couch surfers who prefer budget trips to private jets. (This summer, with Canva already valued at…


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Canva Uncovered: How A Young Australian Kitesurfer Built A $3.2 Billion (Profitable!) Startup Phenom

On a steamy May morning in 2013, Canva CEO Melanie Perkins found herself adrift on a kiteboard in the channel between billionaire Richard Branson’s private Necker and Moskito islands. Her 30-foot sail floating deflated and useless beside her in the strong eastern Caribbean current, the 26-year-old entrepreneur waited for hours to be rescued. As she treaded water, her left leg scarred by a past collision with a coral reef, she reminded herself that her dangerous new hobby was worth it. After all, it was key to the fundraising strategy for the design-software startup she’d cofounded with her boyfriend six years before. Canva was based in Australia, thousands of miles from tech’s Silicon Valley power corridor. Getting a meeting—much less funding—was proving tough. Perkins heard “no” from more than 100 investors. So when she met the organizer of a group of kitesurfing venture capitalists at a pitch competition in her native Perth, Perkins got to training. The next time the group met to hear startup pitches and potentially write crucial early-stage funding checks, she’d have a seat at the table—even if it meant having to brave treacherous waters. “It was like, risk: serious damage; reward: start company,” Perkins says. “If you get your foot in the door just a tiny bit, you have to kind of wedge it all the way in.” Such perseverance has long been a necessity at Canva, which began as a modest yearbook-design business in the state capital of Perth on Australia’s west coast. From those remote origins, Canva has grown into a global juggernaut. Twenty-million-plus users from 190 countries use the company’s “freemium” Web-based app to design everything from splashy Pinterest graphics to elegant restaurant menus. Besides an impossible-to-beat price (millions of users pay nothing at all), Canva’s key advantage over rival products from tech giants like Adobe has been its ease of use. Before Canva, amateurs had to stitch together designs in Microsoft Word or pay through the nose for confusing professional tools. Today, anyone, anywhere, can download Canva and be creating within ten minutes. The company’s revenue comes from upselling to a $10-a-month premium version with snazzier features or, more recently, from sales of a streamlined corporate account option. High-quality stock photos—of which Canva has millions—cost another $1. It adds up. This year the company expects to more than double its revenue to $200 million; its most recent $85 million funding round valued it at $3.2 billion. Perkins, now 32 and an alum of the 2016 Forbes 30 Under 30 Asia list, has an estimated 15% stake, valued at $430 million. Throw in her 34-year-old cofounder—and now fiancé—Cliff Obrecht’s similar stake, and the Aussie power couple are likely worth more than $800 million. In an era of billion-dollar checks from SoftBank and high-profile profligacy at WeWork, Perkins and Obrecht do things differently. They are couch surfers who prefer budget trips to private jets. (This summer, with Canva already valued at…


sample accessily post 3

Canva Uncovered: How A Young Australian Kitesurfer Built A $3.2 Billion (Profitable!) Startup Phenom

On a steamy May morning in 2013, Canva CEO Melanie Perkins found herself adrift on a kiteboard in the channel between billionaire Richard Branson’s private Necker and Moskito islands. Her 30-foot sail floating deflated and useless beside her in the strong eastern Caribbean current, the 26-year-old entrepreneur waited for hours to be rescued. As she treaded water, her left leg scarred by a past collision with a coral reef, she reminded herself that her dangerous new hobby was worth it. After all, it was key to the fundraising strategy for the design-software startup she’d cofounded with her boyfriend six years before. Canva was based in Australia, thousands of miles from tech’s Silicon Valley power corridor. Getting a meeting—much less funding—was proving tough. Perkins heard “no” from more than 100 investors. So when she met the organizer of a group of kitesurfing venture capitalists at a pitch competition in her native Perth, Perkins got to training. The next time the group met to hear startup pitches and potentially write crucial early-stage funding checks, she’d have a seat at the table—even if it meant having to brave treacherous waters. “It was like, risk: serious damage; reward: start company,” Perkins says. “If you get your foot in the door just a tiny bit, you have to kind of wedge it all the way in.” Such perseverance has long been a necessity at Canva, which began as a modest yearbook-design business in the state capital of Perth on Australia’s west coast. From those remote origins, Canva has grown into a global juggernaut. Twenty-million-plus users from 190 countries use the company’s “freemium” Web-based app to design everything from splashy Pinterest graphics to elegant restaurant menus. Besides an impossible-to-beat price (millions of users pay nothing at all), Canva’s key advantage over rival products from tech giants like Adobe has been its ease of use. Before Canva, amateurs had to stitch together designs in Microsoft Word or pay through the nose for confusing professional tools. Today, anyone, anywhere, can download Canva and be creating within ten minutes. The company’s revenue comes from upselling to a $10-a-month premium version with snazzier features or, more recently, from sales of a streamlined corporate account option. High-quality stock photos—of which Canva has millions—cost another $1. It adds up. This year the company expects to more than double its revenue to $200 million; its most recent $85 million funding round valued it at $3.2 billion. Perkins, now 32 and an alum of the 2016 Forbes 30 Under 30 Asia list, has an estimated 15% stake, valued at $430 million. Throw in her 34-year-old cofounder—and now fiancé—Cliff Obrecht’s similar stake, and the Aussie power couple are likely worth more than $800 million. In an era of billion-dollar checks from SoftBank and high-profile profligacy at WeWork, Perkins and Obrecht do things differently. They are couch surfers who prefer budget trips to private jets. (This summer, with Canva already valued at…


sample accessily post 3

Canva Uncovered: How A Young Australian Kitesurfer Built A $3.2 Billion (Profitable!) Startup Phenom

On a steamy May morning in 2013, Canva CEO Melanie Perkins found herself adrift on a kiteboard in the channel between billionaire Richard Branson’s private Necker and Moskito islands. Her 30-foot sail floating deflated and useless beside her in the strong eastern Caribbean current, the 26-year-old entrepreneur waited for hours to be rescued. As she treaded water, her left leg scarred by a past collision with a coral reef, she reminded herself that her dangerous new hobby was worth it. After all, it was key to the fundraising strategy for the design-software startup she’d cofounded with her boyfriend six years before. Canva was based in Australia, thousands of miles from tech’s Silicon Valley power corridor. Getting a meeting—much less funding—was proving tough. Perkins heard “no” from more than 100 investors. So when she met the organizer of a group of kitesurfing venture capitalists at a pitch competition in her native Perth, Perkins got to training. The next time the group met to hear startup pitches and potentially write crucial early-stage funding checks, she’d have a seat at the table—even if it meant having to brave treacherous waters. “It was like, risk: serious damage; reward: start company,” Perkins says. “If you get your foot in the door just a tiny bit, you have to kind of wedge it all the way in.” Such perseverance has long been a necessity at Canva, which began as a modest yearbook-design business in the state capital of Perth on Australia’s west coast. From those remote origins, Canva has grown into a global juggernaut. Twenty-million-plus users from 190 countries use the company’s “freemium” Web-based app to design everything from splashy Pinterest graphics to elegant restaurant menus. Besides an impossible-to-beat price (millions of users pay nothing at all), Canva’s key advantage over rival products from tech giants like Adobe has been its ease of use. Before Canva, amateurs had to stitch together designs in Microsoft Word or pay through the nose for confusing professional tools. Today, anyone, anywhere, can download Canva and be creating within ten minutes. The company’s revenue comes from upselling to a $10-a-month premium version with snazzier features or, more recently, from sales of a streamlined corporate account option. High-quality stock photos—of which Canva has millions—cost another $1. It adds up. This year the company expects to more than double its revenue to $200 million; its most recent $85 million funding round valued it at $3.2 billion. Perkins, now 32 and an alum of the 2016 Forbes 30 Under 30 Asia list, has an estimated 15% stake, valued at $430 million. Throw in her 34-year-old cofounder—and now fiancé—Cliff Obrecht’s similar stake, and the Aussie power couple are likely worth more than $800 million. In an era of billion-dollar checks from SoftBank and high-profile profligacy at WeWork, Perkins and Obrecht do things differently. They are couch surfers who prefer budget trips to private jets. (This summer, with Canva already valued at…


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China’s Richest 2019: Growing Consumer Appetite Boosts Fortunes Of Nation’s Wealthiest

This story is part of Forbes’ coverage of China’s Richest 2019.

The headlines from China in the past year have been gloomy. Trade friction with the U.S. has risen, while GDP growth in the world’s second-largest economy slowed to a near three-decade low of 6%. Happily for the country’s wealthiest, however, there’s more good news than bad among the members of our list of China’s richest.

The total wealth of the 400 members of the China Rich List rose by more than a fifth from a year ago, to $1.29 trillion, as China’s consumers spent more on everything and spent more of it online. More than half the listees saw their fortunes climb in the past year, while a quarter saw their fortunes fall. The minimum net worth needed to make the list this year was $1 billion, back to 2017’s threshold, after dropping in 2018 to $840 million. There were 60 newcomers to the list; returnees made up most of the rest.

Topping the list for a second year is Jack Ma, who recently resigned as chairman of the e-commerce giant he co-founded, Alibaba, to focus on philanthropy. Ma’s fortune rose to $38.2 billion from $34.6 billion a year earlier as New York-listed Alibaba gained on China’s e-commerce boom. Second and third on the list: Tencent CEO Huateng “Pony” Ma, with a fortune worth $36 billion, and Evergrande Group Chairman Hui Ka Yan, worth an estimated $27.7 billion, their ranks are unchanged from last year.

Growing fortunes in online shopping appear throughout the list. Colin Huang, CEO of e-commerce site Pinduoduo, saw his estimated net worth soar to $21.2 billion from $11.25 billion last year as Pinduoduo gained on rival JD.com. Entrepreneurs who provide services tied to e-commerce also did well: Lai Meisong, CEO of Alibaba-backed express delivery firm ZTO, saw his fortune climb to $4.6 billion from $3.35 billion.

Pharmaceutical and healthcare fortunes are also benefitting as rising incomes enable Chinese to spend more on healthcare. Sun Piaoyang, chairman of Jiangsu Hengrui Medicine, moved up to No. 4 with a fortune of $25.8 billion. He shares that spot with his wife Zhong Huijuan. The two gained on growing business at Sun’s Hengrui as well as a Hong Kong IPO by Zhong-led company Jiangsu Hansoh Pharmaceutical. Li Xiting, chairman of medical equipment supplier Shenzhen Mindray Bio-Medical Electronics, also moved up to about $8.5 billion from $1.8 billion as its shares soared after the company relisted its shares at home in China following its 2016 delisting from the New York Stock Exchange.

Sportswear maker Anta Sports’ Hong Kong-listed shares have more than doubled in the past year, helping propel the fortune of its two leaders—brothers Ding Shizhong and Ding Shijia—up by almost 150% to $5.6 and $5.5 billion, respectively. Two Anta executives also landed on the list for the first time: CFO Lai Shixian, a Ding brother-in-law, at $1.4 billion and Wang Wenmo, a family cousin who manages Anta’s …


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China’s Richest 2019: Growing Consumer Appetite Boosts Fortunes Of Nation’s Wealthiest

This story is part of Forbes’ coverage of China’s Richest 2019.

The headlines from China in the past year have been gloomy. Trade friction with the U.S. has risen, while GDP growth in the world’s second-largest economy slowed to a near three-decade low of 6%. Happily for the country’s wealthiest, however, there’s more good news than bad among the members of our list of China’s richest.

The total wealth of the 400 members of the China Rich List rose by more than a fifth from a year ago, to $1.29 trillion, as China’s consumers spent more on everything and spent more of it online. More than half the listees saw their fortunes climb in the past year, while a quarter saw their fortunes fall. The minimum net worth needed to make the list this year was $1 billion, back to 2017’s threshold, after dropping in 2018 to $840 million. There were 60 newcomers to the list; returnees made up most of the rest.

Topping the list for a second year is Jack Ma, who recently resigned as chairman of the e-commerce giant he co-founded, Alibaba, to focus on philanthropy. Ma’s fortune rose to $38.2 billion from $34.6 billion a year earlier as New York-listed Alibaba gained on China’s e-commerce boom. Second and third on the list: Tencent CEO Huateng “Pony” Ma, with a fortune worth $36 billion, and Evergrande Group Chairman Hui Ka Yan, worth an estimated $27.7 billion, their ranks are unchanged from last year.

Growing fortunes in online shopping appear throughout the list. Colin Huang, CEO of e-commerce site Pinduoduo, saw his estimated net worth soar to $21.2 billion from $11.25 billion last year as Pinduoduo gained on rival JD.com. Entrepreneurs who provide services tied to e-commerce also did well: Lai Meisong, CEO of Alibaba-backed express delivery firm ZTO, saw his fortune climb to $4.6 billion from $3.35 billion.

Pharmaceutical and healthcare fortunes are also benefitting as rising incomes enable Chinese to spend more on healthcare. Sun Piaoyang, chairman of Jiangsu Hengrui Medicine, moved up to No. 4 with a fortune of $25.8 billion. He shares that spot with his wife Zhong Huijuan. The two gained on growing business at Sun’s Hengrui as well as a Hong Kong IPO by Zhong-led company Jiangsu Hansoh Pharmaceutical. Li Xiting, chairman of medical equipment supplier Shenzhen Mindray Bio-Medical Electronics, also moved up to about $8.5 billion from $1.8 billion as its shares soared after the company relisted its shares at home in China following its 2016 delisting from the New York Stock Exchange.

Sportswear maker Anta Sports’ Hong Kong-listed shares have more than doubled in the past year, helping propel the fortune of its two leaders—brothers Ding Shizhong and Ding Shijia—up by almost 150% to $5.6 and $5.5 billion, respectively. Two Anta executives also landed on the list for the first time: CFO Lai Shixian, a Ding brother-in-law, at $1.4 billion and Wang Wenmo, a family cousin who manages Anta’s …